Knitting a Sweater: The Ariel Method

I learned how to crochet as a kid at camp, and taught myself to knit while in High School. For years I mostly made crochet toys and the occasional knit cap or scarf. As you do when you first learn something I stuck to what I know. 

Sweaters terrified me. 

I remember walking into my LYS and this lovely, kind, lady talked with me. She asked what I was looking for and once we got to talking I told her my fear of sweaters. She kinda laughed a little and stated that the toys I had been whipping out all these years are far more complicated than a sweater. It still took a couple more years and a job at that LYS to break my sweater bubble, but once I did, it was all over. 

Step 1: Find a yarn you love

Sweet Georgia Tough Love in Honey Fig

Step 2: Buy enough for a sweater

Step 3: Find the perfect pattern for your yarn. Start knitting your sweater, and make good progress. Enjoy the color and pattern while thinking of what accessories you need to make to go with it.

Step 4: Get distracted by other sweaters you want to knit while browsing on Ravelry.

Step 5: Find Yarn that Needs to be a sweater. 

Vista by Classic Elite in Beaver Grey and Ash

Vista by Classic Elite in Beaver Grey and Ash

Step 6: Wind the yarn (so there is no going back) and find the perfect pattern. 

Wild Things bag by Stitch Marks The Spot and Vista Yarn by Classic Elite

Wild Things bag by Stitch Marks The Spot and Vista Yarn by Classic Elite

Step 7: Start knitting your sweater and ignore that the first one isn't done. 

Step 8: repeat steps 1-7 until you have a bunch of sweaters, or you have run out of needles. 

I don't recommend this method for everyone. It requires; friends who don't judge the number of projects you have cast on, a ton of yarn, time, concentration, and the ability to ignore all those full project bags. Plus I think you need a dash of weird artist energy. 

Here are the two sweaters I currently have cast on and I promise I won't cast on any more (today).

So happy crafting everyone! Now I leave you with a question and a random interjection.

How many projects is your limit? 

and Meanwhile in Norway!

I want to live where it's perfectly acceptable to have trees on the roof.

I want to live where it's perfectly acceptable to have trees on the roof.